The Divided Mind of the Black Church

The Divided Mind of the Black Church

eBook - 2013
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What is the true nature and mission of the church? Is its proper Christian purpose to save souls, or to transform the social order? This question is especially fraught when the church is one built by an enslaved people and formed, from its beginning, at the center of an oppressed community's fight for personhood and freedom. Such is the central tension in the identity and mission of the black church in the United States. For decades the black church and black theology have held each other at arm's length. Black theology has emphasized the role of Christian faith in addressing racism and other forms of oppression, arguing that Jesus urged his disciples to seek the freedom of all peoples. Meanwhile, the black church, even when focused on social concerns, has often emphasized personal piety rather than social protest. With the rising influence of white evangelicalism, biblical fundamentalism, and the prosperity gospel, the divide has become even more pronounced. In The Divided Mind of the Black Church, Raphael G. Warnock, Senior Pastor of the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, the spiritual home of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., traces the historical significance of the rise and development of black theology as an important conversation partner for the black church. Calling for honest dialogue between black and womanist theologians and black pastors, this fresh theological treatment demands a new look at the church's essential mission.| "Argues with scholarly rigor and pastoral fire... A must read." – Emilie M. Townes, Dean and Professor of Ethics and Society, Vanderbilt University Divinity School. "Groundbreaking... rooted in deep spirituality and progressive commitment to the Bible." – Dwight N. Hopkins, editor of The Cambridge Companion to Black Theology "An insightful treatment... Bold and imaginative." – Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies, Princeton University "Courageous and timely... Looks to the past in order to move forward!" – Cornel West, Class of 1943 University Professor, Princeton University "Leads us through the history." – James A. Forbes Jr., Harry Emerson Fosdick Distinguished Professor, Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York "Impeccable scholarship, critical insight, and analytical eloquence... a lucid, coherent, and compelling narrative... erudite, comprehensive, and intriguing." – The Reverend Dennis W. Wiley, Ph. D., Pastor, Covenant Baptist United Church of Christ "Brilliantly conversant... yet works in the ebony trenches for justice." – Frederick D. Haynes III, Senior Pastor, Friendship-West Baptist Church
Publisher: [S.I.] : NYU Press, 2013.
ISBN: 9781479864102
Additional Contributors: Overdrive Inc
Summary: What is the true nature and mission of the church? Is its proper Christian purpose to save souls, or to transform the social order? This question is especially fraught when the church is one built by an enslaved people and formed, from its beginning, at the center of an oppressed community's fight for personhood and freedom. Such is the central tension in the identity and mission of the black church in the United States. For decades the black church and black theology have held each other at arm's length. Black theology has emphasized the role of Christian faith in addressing racism and other forms of oppression, arguing that Jesus urged his disciples to seek the freedom of all peoples. Meanwhile, the black church, even when focused on social concerns, has often emphasized personal piety rather than social protest. With the rising influence of white evangelicalism, biblical fundamentalism, and the prosperity gospel, the divide has become even more pronounced. In The Divided Mind of the Black Church, Raphael G. Warnock, Senior Pastor of the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, the spiritual home of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., traces the historical significance of the rise and development of black theology as an important conversation partner for the black church. Calling for honest dialogue between black and womanist theologians and black pastors, this fresh theological treatment demands a new look at the church's essential mission.| "Argues with scholarly rigor and pastoral fire... A must read." – Emilie M. Townes, Dean and Professor of Ethics and Society, Vanderbilt University Divinity School. "Groundbreaking... rooted in deep spirituality and progressive commitment to the Bible." – Dwight N. Hopkins, editor of The Cambridge Companion to Black Theology "An insightful treatment... Bold and imaginative." – Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies, Princeton University "Courageous and timely... Looks to the past in order to move forward!" – Cornel West, Class of 1943 University Professor, Princeton University "Leads us through the history." – James A. Forbes Jr., Harry Emerson Fosdick Distinguished Professor, Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York "Impeccable scholarship, critical insight, and analytical eloquence... a lucid, coherent, and compelling narrative... erudite, comprehensive, and intriguing." – The Reverend Dennis W. Wiley, Ph. D., Pastor, Covenant Baptist United Church of Christ "Brilliantly conversant... yet works in the ebony trenches for justice." – Frederick D. Haynes III, Senior Pastor, Friendship-West Baptist Church

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