House of Lost Worlds

House of Lost Worlds

Dinosaurs, Dynasties, and the Story of Life on Earth

Book - 2016
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The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, now celebrating its 150th anniversary, has remade the way we see the world. Delving into the museum's storied and colorful past, award-winning author Richard Conniff introduces a cast of bold explorers, roughneck bone hunters, and visionary scientists. Some became famous for wresting Brontosaurus, Triceratops, and other dinosaurs from the earth, others pioneered the introduction of science education in North America, and still others rediscovered the long-buried glory of Machu Picchu. In this lively tale of events, achievements, and scandals from throughout the museum's history. Readers will encounter renowned paleontologist O.C. Marsh who engaged in ferocious combat with his "Bone Wars" rival Edward Drinker Cope, as well as dozens of other intriguing characters. Nearly 100 color images portray important figures in the Peabody's history and special objects from the museum's 13-million-item collections.
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, 2016.
ISBN: 9780300211634
0300211635
Characteristics: xvi, 331 pages : photographs ; 26 cm.
Contents: Introduction : Hunting for truffles
A West that was actually wild
The patriarch
The education of O.C. Marsh
The wooing of George Peabody
Rock render
A rumor of war
The Marsh expeditions
Professor M on the warpath
The year of enormous dinosaurs
Fossils, buffalo, and the birth of American conservation
A building of their own
In the shadow of O.C. Marsh
The prince of bounty hunters
Bone wars
Trilobite magic and cycad obsessions
Mapping ancient worlds
A city raised like a chalice
Teaching evolution
The rise of modern ecology
The beauty of the beasts
The art of being invisible
Into the unmapped world
Zoology in the time of geneticists
The man who saved dinosaurs.
Summary: The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, now celebrating its 150th anniversary, has remade the way we see the world. Delving into the museum's storied and colorful past, award-winning author Richard Conniff introduces a cast of bold explorers, roughneck bone hunters, and visionary scientists. Some became famous for wresting Brontosaurus, Triceratops, and other dinosaurs from the earth, others pioneered the introduction of science education in North America, and still others rediscovered the long-buried glory of Machu Picchu. In this lively tale of events, achievements, and scandals from throughout the museum's history. Readers will encounter renowned paleontologist O.C. Marsh who engaged in ferocious combat with his "Bone Wars" rival Edward Drinker Cope, as well as dozens of other intriguing characters. Nearly 100 color images portray important figures in the Peabody's history and special objects from the museum's 13-million-item collections.

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Plsreadmore
Jan 12, 2018

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, start to finish. Aside from scientific information about life on our planet hundreds of millions of years ago and why various discoveries (sometimes in our own backyards) are important, it describes university politics and personal relationships and rivalries between the principals. The motivation and the hardships that people endured in the quest for knowledge (or fame) are a story in themselves. A compelling argument is made for the existence of museums, whether as repositories for scientists (with collections rediscovered sometimes 100 years after collection), as entertainment, or education. I have a new perspective on and appreciation for museums and the people who make them possible.

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