The Big Scrum

The Big Scrum

How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football

eBook - 2011 | 1st ed.
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The never-before-fully-told story of how Theodore Roosevelt helped to save the game that would become America's most popular sport. During the late nineteenth century, the game of football was a work in progress that only remotely resembled the sport of today. There was no agreement about many of the basic rules, and it was incredibly violent and extremely dangerous. Numerous young men were badly injured and dozens died in highly publicized incidents, often at America's top prep schools and colleges. Objecting to the sport's brutality, a movement of proto-Progressives tried to abolish the game. President Theodore Roosevelt, a vocal advocate of "the strenuous life" and a proponent of risk, acknowledged football's dangers but admired its potential for building character. In 1905, he summoned the coaches of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to the White House. The result was the establishment of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, as well as a series of rule changes that ultimately transformed football into the quintessential American game.--From publisher description.
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins, c2011.
Edition: 1st ed.
ISBN: 9780062078995
0062078992
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xi, 258 p., [8] leaves of plates) : ill.
Contents: The killing fields
Creation stories
Game time
Camp days
The capacity to inflict pain
The virile virtues
Let them be men first
Rough riding
Football is a fight
The air war.
Summary: The never-before-fully-told story of how Theodore Roosevelt helped to save the game that would become America's most popular sport. During the late nineteenth century, the game of football was a work in progress that only remotely resembled the sport of today. There was no agreement about many of the basic rules, and it was incredibly violent and extremely dangerous. Numerous young men were badly injured and dozens died in highly publicized incidents, often at America's top prep schools and colleges. Objecting to the sport's brutality, a movement of proto-Progressives tried to abolish the game. President Theodore Roosevelt, a vocal advocate of "the strenuous life" and a proponent of risk, acknowledged football's dangers but admired its potential for building character. In 1905, he summoned the coaches of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to the White House. The result was the establishment of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, as well as a series of rule changes that ultimately transformed football into the quintessential American game.--From publisher description.

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