Gratitude

Gratitude

eBook - 2015
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"My predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved. I have been given much and I have given something in return. Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure."--Oliver Sacks. No writer has succeeded in capturing the medical and human drama of illness as honestly and as eloquently as Oliver Sacks. During the last few months of his life, he wrote a set of essays in which he movingly explored his feelings about completing a life and coming to terms with his own death. "It is the fate of every human being," Sacks writes, "to be a unique individual, to find his own path, to live his own life, to die his own death." Together, these four essays form an ode to the uniqueness of each human being and to gratitude for the gift of life. "Oliver Sacks was like no other clinician, or writer. He was drawn to the homes of the sick, the institutions of the most frail and disabled, the company of the unusual and the 'abnormal.' He wanted to see humanity in its many variants and to do so in his own, almost anachronistic way--face to face, over time, away from our burgeoning apparatus of computers and algorithms. And, through his writing, he showed us what he saw."--Atul Gawande, author of Being Mortal. From the Hardcover edition.
Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2015.
ISBN: 9781743548936
1743548931
9780451492968
045149296X
Characteristics: 1 online resource.
Summary: "My predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved. I have been given much and I have given something in return. Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure."--Oliver Sacks. No writer has succeeded in capturing the medical and human drama of illness as honestly and as eloquently as Oliver Sacks. During the last few months of his life, he wrote a set of essays in which he movingly explored his feelings about completing a life and coming to terms with his own death. "It is the fate of every human being," Sacks writes, "to be a unique individual, to find his own path, to live his own life, to die his own death." Together, these four essays form an ode to the uniqueness of each human being and to gratitude for the gift of life. "Oliver Sacks was like no other clinician, or writer. He was drawn to the homes of the sick, the institutions of the most frail and disabled, the company of the unusual and the 'abnormal.' He wanted to see humanity in its many variants and to do so in his own, almost anachronistic way--face to face, over time, away from our burgeoning apparatus of computers and algorithms. And, through his writing, he showed us what he saw."--Atul Gawande, author of Being Mortal. From the Hardcover edition.

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1
1aa
Jul 19, 2017

Extremely brief but poignant and simple: from the heart. I had never known - and didn't suspect either - that he was homosexual (at least he didn't make such a big fuss about it).

j
JudithE
Oct 29, 2016

Short and lovely. A book I think I'd like to revisit when my death is closer. Thoughtful, simple. I may order it and add it to my "read to me when I'm dying" bookshelf.

r
Riddlereads
Oct 25, 2016

Gratitude is a quick and wonderful read--just a glimpse into Sacks' feelings on coming to terms with his imminent death and his appreciation for a life well-lived.

n
nofun7notever
Sep 23, 2016

This wonderful book is an interesting middle ground between emotional and stoic, a glimpse into the mindset of someone that is fully aware of their own pending death and their own ambivalence between fear and acceptance. Oliver Sacks is a terrific writer and this is a perfect ending to an illustrious career as a writer on neuroscience and hallucination. If you like this, read anything else from Sacks, or if you prefer your memoirs slightly more raw, William S Burroughs' final work, Last Words.

t
thinkingdoc
Jul 16, 2016

Short, lovely, thought provoking read. Written at the end of his life, these short pieces are full of gratitude for a life fully experienced.

s
sneha
Jul 09, 2016

A short, lovely read.

If you aren't familiar with the work of Oliver Sacks, I would recommend that you read one of his books on his neurological patients (like The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat) before this one.

k
kakacurt
Apr 14, 2016

Excellent for Seniors or others who onder their mortality.

m
merci4u
Apr 06, 2016

Like a water in the desert, his words opened my heart silently and surely. Life is blessed to everyone, but it depends on each person.

k
klmt
Mar 25, 2016

Read 'On The Move' first and then read this very small book of 4 essays remembering that this is the last writing of Oliver Sacks. It is a surprisingly short and very simple read. It reflects a beautiful spirit and a gentleness of age.

ktnv Mar 25, 2016

A small book, a beautiful read, the last writing of Oliver Sacks.
“Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.”
― Oliver Sacks, Gratitude

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