In Harm's Way

In Harm's Way

The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis and the Extraordinary Story of Its Survivors

eBook - 2001
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On July 30, 1945, the USS Indianapolis was torpedoed in the South Pacific by a Japanese submarine. An estimated 300 men were killed upon impact; close to 900 sailors were cast into the Pacific Ocean, where they struggled to stay alive, battered by a savage sea and fighting off sharks, hypothermia, and dementia. By the time help arrived-nearly four days and nights later-all but 317 men had died. How did the navy fail to realize the Indianapolis was missing? Why was the cruiser traveling unescorted in enemy waters? And how did these 317 men manage to survive? Interweaving the stories of three survivors-the captain, the ship's doctor, and a young marine-journalist Doug Stanton has brought this astonishing human drama to life in a narrative that is at once immediate and timeless. The definitive account of this harrowing chapter of World War II history, In Harm's Way is a classic tale of war, survival, and extraordinary courage. Now available for the first time in trade paperback, the bestselling account of America's worst naval disaster-and of the heroism of the men who, against all odds, survived On July 30, 1945, after the USS Indianapolis was torpedoed in the South Pacific by a Japanese submarine.
Publisher: ©2001
New York :, H. Holt,, [2003, 2001]
Edition: First Owl Books edition.
Copyright Date: ©2001
ISBN: 9781466818781
1466818786
9780805073669
0805073663
Characteristics: 1 online resource (339 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations, map.
Summary: On July 30, 1945, the USS Indianapolis was torpedoed in the South Pacific by a Japanese submarine. An estimated 300 men were killed upon impact; close to 900 sailors were cast into the Pacific Ocean, where they struggled to stay alive, battered by a savage sea and fighting off sharks, hypothermia, and dementia. By the time help arrived-nearly four days and nights later-all but 317 men had died. How did the navy fail to realize the Indianapolis was missing? Why was the cruiser traveling unescorted in enemy waters? And how did these 317 men manage to survive? Interweaving the stories of three survivors-the captain, the ship's doctor, and a young marine-journalist Doug Stanton has brought this astonishing human drama to life in a narrative that is at once immediate and timeless. The definitive account of this harrowing chapter of World War II history, In Harm's Way is a classic tale of war, survival, and extraordinary courage. Now available for the first time in trade paperback, the bestselling account of America's worst naval disaster-and of the heroism of the men who, against all odds, survived On July 30, 1945, after the USS Indianapolis was torpedoed in the South Pacific by a Japanese submarine.

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AL_MARCIA Jan 29, 2017

A chilling tale of the fate of the USS Indianapolis crew during World War II.

z
zipread
Oct 12, 2016

In Harm's Way. --- by. --- Doug Stanton. .
Author Stanton has written a vivid narrative that would be unbelievable if it were a tale of fiction. But it is not. It is the story of a US naval vessel, the USS Indianapolis which at 12:05 am on July 30, 1945 was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine. Two of the four torpedoes the sub fired struck the Indianapolis. Within nine minutes the naval vessel sunk Of a crew of 1196, ultimately only 317 survived. Left adrift for four days after the sinking, naval incompetence finally realized a ship was missing. Military intelligence. The survivors were found more or less by accident before the navy even realized what had happened. One by one, the crew who had survived the sinking itself died of a variety of causes: hydration; sun and heat exposure; drowning; hallucination and predation by sharks. Fifty sailors were lost to sharks a night. The Sharks bumped up at the three life nets; they pulled sailors from their live preservers; they devoured them bit by bit.
Gruesome to say the least.
At the end of the war, the navy had to determine the cause of what it hadn't done to save the survivors. So they cast about for a
scapegoat. They made one of the captain..Capain McVay was court martialed.
Dishonoured though innocent he eventually committed suicide.
Only much later did the navy admit its culpability.
In 2000, an Act of Congress passed a resolution that Captain McVay's record should state that "he is exonerated for the loss of Indianapolis." President Bill Clinton signed the resolution.
This book is not simply a story of recent history. It is a tale of incompetence at the highest level. It is a story about perseverance, of dedication and loyalty'
It is a book both vivid and gripping. Hard to put down.

d
drewdarc
Jul 15, 2016

Outstanding piece of history. The tragic story of the people aboard the Indianapolis who endured attack, sinking, fire, and then sharks. It will leave you speechless.

v
vv8
Jul 26, 2015

In Harm's Way is a must-read for fans of military history, World War II content, and stories of unthinkable courage in the face of disaster.

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