British English A to Zed

British English A to Zed

A Definitive Guide to the Queen's English

eBook - 2013
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For readers, travelers, and Anglophiles everywhere, this entertaining and authoritative resource is a cultural delight.Whether you are traveling to Great Britain or just want to understand British popular culture, this unique dictionary will answer your questions. British English from A to Zed contains more than 5,500 British terms and their American equivalents, each with a short explanation of the term's history and an example of its use. The appendixes provide valuable supplemental material with differences between British and American pronunciation, grammar, and spelling as well as terms grouped in specific areas such as currency, weight, and numbers.This dictionary will help you unravel the meanings of: Berk (idiot), Bevvied up (drunk), Crisps (potato chips), Erk (rookie), To judder (to shake), Noughts and crosses (tic-tac-toe) and more! George Bernard Shaw famously said that the British and Americans were "two peoples separated by a common language." This book bridges that gap.
Publisher: New York : Skyhorse, c2013.
Edition: 1st Skyhorse Publishing ed.
ISBN: 9781626364677
1626364672
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xii, 466 p.)
Summary: For readers, travelers, and Anglophiles everywhere, this entertaining and authoritative resource is a cultural delight.Whether you are traveling to Great Britain or just want to understand British popular culture, this unique dictionary will answer your questions. British English from A to Zed contains more than 5,500 British terms and their American equivalents, each with a short explanation of the term's history and an example of its use. The appendixes provide valuable supplemental material with differences between British and American pronunciation, grammar, and spelling as well as terms grouped in specific areas such as currency, weight, and numbers.This dictionary will help you unravel the meanings of: Berk (idiot), Bevvied up (drunk), Crisps (potato chips), Erk (rookie), To judder (to shake), Noughts and crosses (tic-tac-toe) and more! George Bernard Shaw famously said that the British and Americans were "two peoples separated by a common language." This book bridges that gap.

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