Musicophilia

Musicophilia

And Other Tales of Music and the Brain

Downloadable Audiobook - 2007
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Music is irresistible, haunting, and unforgettable, and in Musicophilia, Oliver Sacks tells us why. Music can move us to the heights or depths of emotion. It can persuade us to buy something, or remind us of our first date. It can lift us out of depression when nothing else can. It can get us dancing to its beat. But the power of music goes much, much further. Indeed, music occupies more areas of our brain than language does--humans are a musical species. Oliver Sacks's compassionate, compelling tales of people struggling to adapt to different neurological conditions have fundamentally changed the way we think of our own brains, and of the human experience. In Musicophilia, he examines the powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians, and everyday people--from a man who is struck by lightning and suddenly inspired to become a pianist at the age of forty-two, to an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; from people with "amusia," to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans, to a man whose memory spans only seven seconds--for everything but music.
Publisher: New York : Books on Tape, 2007.
ISBN: 9781415942680
1415942684
Additional Contributors: Lee, John Rafter
Summary: Music is irresistible, haunting, and unforgettable, and in Musicophilia, Oliver Sacks tells us why. Music can move us to the heights or depths of emotion. It can persuade us to buy something, or remind us of our first date. It can lift us out of depression when nothing else can. It can get us dancing to its beat. But the power of music goes much, much further. Indeed, music occupies more areas of our brain than language does--humans are a musical species. Oliver Sacks's compassionate, compelling tales of people struggling to adapt to different neurological conditions have fundamentally changed the way we think of our own brains, and of the human experience. In Musicophilia, he examines the powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians, and everyday people--from a man who is struck by lightning and suddenly inspired to become a pianist at the age of forty-two, to an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; from people with "amusia," to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans, to a man whose memory spans only seven seconds--for everything but music.

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BostonPL_LauraB Mar 15, 2017

Take my rating with a grain of salt because audio was just not the right format for me to read this book in. I think I would have enjoyed it much more if I would have read it. Strangely, I think the narrator was the same (or very, very similar) to the one in the audio of 1984 that I listened to, and I had the same issue of not being able to concentrate at all. So overall, the stories that I listened (and paid attention to) were interesting - who knew that music has so many effects on the body besides enjoyment and emotion? I'd try something from Sacks again, just not in audio.

c
chgarland
Oct 31, 2010

I have very mixed feelings about this audio book. The content is interesting, but the reader sounds like he is auditioning for the Upper-Class Twit of the Year contest. In short, I would recommend reading the actual book rather than listening to it.

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