The Story of English in 100 Hundred Words

The Story of English in 100 Hundred Words

eBook - 2011
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In this unique new history of the world's most ubiquitous language, linguistics expert David Crystal draws on words that best illustrate the huge variety of sources, influences and events that have helped to shape our vernacular since the first definitively English word was written down in the fifth century ('roe', in case you are wondering). Featuring Latinate and Celtic words, weasel words and nonce-words, ancient words ('loaf') to cutting edge ('twittersphere') and spanning the indispensable words that shape our tongue ('and', 'what') to the more fanciful ('fopdoodle'), Crystal takes us alo.
Publisher: London : Profile, 2011.
ISBN: 9781847654595
1847654592
Characteristics: 1 online resource (320 p.)
Contents: 62 Trek - a word from Africa (19th century)
49 Fopdoodle - a lost word (17th century)50 Billion - a confusing ambiguity (17th century); 51 Yogurt - a choice of spelling (17th century); 52 Gazette - a taste of journalese (17th century); 53 Tea - a social word (17th century); 54 Disinterested - a confusible (17th century); 55 Polite - a matter of manners (17th century); 56 Dilly-dally - a reduplicating word (17th century); 57 Rep - a clipping (17th century); 58 Americanism - a new nation (18th century); 59 Edit - a back-formation (18th century); 60 Species - classifying things (18th century); 61 Ain't - right and wrong (18th century)
37 Matrix - a word from Tyndale (16th century)38 Alphabet - talking about writing (16th century); 39 Potato - a European import (16th century); 40 Debt - a spelling reform (16th century); 41 Ink-horn - a classical flood (16th century); 42 Dialect - regional variation (16th century); 43 Bodgery - word-coiners (16th century); 44 Undeaf - a word from Shakespeare (16th century); 45 Skunk - an early Americanism (17th century); 46 Shibboleth - a word from King James (17th century); 47 Bloody - an emerging swear-word (17th century); 48 Lakh - a word from India (17th century)
25 Wicked - a radical alteration (13th century)26 Wee - a Scottish contribution (14th century); 27 Grammar - a surprising link (14th century); 28 Valentine - first name into word (14th century); 29 Egg - a dialect choice (14th century); 30 Royal - word triplets (14th century); 31 Money - a productive idiom (14th century); 32 Music - a spelling in evolution (14th century); 33 Taffeta - an early trade word (14th century); 34 Information(s) - (un)countable nouns (14th century); 35 Gaggle - a collective noun (15th century); 36 Doable - a mixing of languages (15th century)
12 Brock - a Celtic arrival (10th century)13 English - the language named (10th century); 14 Bridegroom - a popular etymology (11th century); 15 Arse - an impolite word (11th century); 16 Swain - a poetic expression (12th century); 17 Pork - an elegant word (13th century); 18 Chattels - a legal word (13th century); 19 Dame - a form of address (13th century); 20 Skirt - a word doublet (13th century); 21 Jail - competing words (13th century); 22 Take away - a phrasal verb (13th century); 23 Cuckoo - a sound-symbolic word (13th century); 24 Cunt - a taboo word (13th century)
Cover Page; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Preface; A short history of English words; 1 Roe - the first word (5th century); 2 Lea - naming places (8th century); 3 And - an early abbreviation (8th century); 4 Loaf - an unexpected origin (9th century); 5 Out - changing grammar (9th century); 6 Street - a Latin loan (9th century); 7 Mead - a window into history (9th century); 8 Merry - a dialect survivor (9th century); 9 Riddle - playing with language (10th century); 10 What - an early exclamation (10th century); 11 Bone-house - a word-painting (10th century)
Summary: In this unique new history of the world's most ubiquitous language, linguistics expert David Crystal draws on words that best illustrate the huge variety of sources, influences and events that have helped to shape our vernacular since the first definitively English word was written down in the fifth century ('roe', in case you are wondering). Featuring Latinate and Celtic words, weasel words and nonce-words, ancient words ('loaf') to cutting edge ('twittersphere') and spanning the indispensable words that shape our tongue ('and', 'what') to the more fanciful ('fopdoodle'), Crystal takes us alo.

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