Queen of the Conqueror

Queen of the Conqueror

The Life of Matilda, Wife of William I

eBook - 2012 | 1st U.S. ed.
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Tracy Borman lays out Matilda's remarkable story against one of the most fascinating and transformative periods in European history. Stirring, richly detailed, and wholly involving, Queen of the Conqueror reveals not just an extraordinary figure but an iconic woman who shaped generations, and an era that cast the essential framework for the world we know today.
Publisher: New York : Bantam Books, [2012], c2011.
Edition: 1st U.S. ed.
ISBN: 9780553908251
0553908251
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xxxi, 295 p., [8] p. of plates) : ill. (some col.), maps, genealogical tables.
Contents: "Of kingly line"
William the Bastard
The rough wooing
Birth of a dynasty
Duchess of Normandy
Earl Harold
Conquest
"A fatal disaster"
Queen of England
"The English tumults"
"Mutual and lasting hostility"
"Matilda, wealthy and powerful"
A "wholly wretched mother"
"A faithless wife"
"Murmurs of loud and heartfelt grief"
"The storms of troubles"
"Mother of Kings."
Summary: Tracy Borman lays out Matilda's remarkable story against one of the most fascinating and transformative periods in European history. Stirring, richly detailed, and wholly involving, Queen of the Conqueror reveals not just an extraordinary figure but an iconic woman who shaped generations, and an era that cast the essential framework for the world we know today.

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yellow_panda_309
May 03, 2017

This is a very interesting book.First one I've seen of a Queen Consort.You can tell the author has done a lot of research. Had no idea Matilda was so influential.Wow!

d
DorisWaggoner
Nov 22, 2016

This first bio of Matilda, wife of William the Conqueror, is very different from Borman's bio of Elizabeth I. A big reason is that Matilda, one of Elizabeth's ancestors, was, whether Elizabeth knew it or not, a major role model for her descendant and all queens to follow, whether queen consorts like Matilda or reigning queens like Elizabeth. Matilda and William had very different personalities, and she, traditionally, stayed in the background--most of the time. Matilda's descent was better than her husband's, which mattered in the 11th c. Her education was much better than his, and comparable to Elizabeth's. While both of the couple were pious, Matilda expressed her faith not just in endowing monasteries and abbeys, as did her husband, but in attending services regularly herself. She was loyal to him, but probably loved him less than he loved her; William was one of the few kings of the time who was faithful to his wife. Ambitious, she wanted to see her 3 sons on the thrones of as many kingdoms as possible. Unfortunately, while William felt the same way, they backed different sons. And their marriage suffered a major break when she openly backed their firstborn for England, who didn't have what it took. The couple were able to patch things up, which says a lot for their devotion. I appreciate Borman's bios for their deep research; but when the evidence isn't there, she admits it. And she's a wonderful writer. I really felt like I knew both Matilda and William.

l
Logovore
Sep 09, 2015

There are a number of histories of William and their sons, but so far this is the first that I've seen of Matilda.

It's quite an interesting work. The author makes a point that education opportunities for women were more available in the 900s-1000s than earlier or later and that her upbringing gave Matilda the resources to play a large part in the dynamics of Normandy and England.

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