Salmon Fishing in the Yemen

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen

eBook - 2008 | 1st Harvest ed.
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Publisher: Orlando, FL : Harcourt, 2008.
Edition: 1st Harvest ed.
ISBN: 9780547416250
0547416253
Characteristics: 1 online resource (333 p.)
Contents: 1. The origins of the Yemen Salmon Project
2. Extracts from the diary of Dr Alfred Jones: his wedding anniversary
3. Feasibility of introducing salmon into the Yemen
4. Extracts from the diary of Dr Jones: his meeting with Sheikh Muhammad
5. Extracts from the diary of Dr Jones: marital issues may have clouded his judgement
6. Correspondence between Captain Robert Matthews and Ms Harriet Chetwode-Talbot
7. Press comment
8. Intercepts of al-Qaeda email traffic
9. Interview with Peter Maxwell, director of communications, prime minister's office
10. Transcript of interview with the prime minister, the Rt Hon. Jay Vent MP, on BBC1 The Politics Show
11. Continuation of interview with Peter Maxwell
12. Email correspondence between David Sugden, NCFE, and Mr Tom Price-Williams, head of fisheries, Environment Agency
13. Extract from the diary of Dr Jones: his return to Glen Tulloch
14. Interview with Alfred Dr Jones: his meeting with Mr Peter Maxwell and Sheikh Muhammad
15. Peter Maxwell is interviewed for the "Time Off" column of the Sunday Telegraph, 4 September
16. Interview with Ms Harriet Chetwode-Talbot
17. Extract from Hansard
18. The termination of the employment contract of Dr Jones
19. Correspondence between Captain Robert Matthews and Ms Harriet Chetwode-Talbot
20. Intercepts of al-Qaeda email traffic
21. Extract from Hansard
22. Extracts from the diary of Dr Jones: he visits the Yemen
23. Extract from Hansard
24. Correspondence between Ms Chetwode-Talbot and herself
25. Extract from Peter Maxwell's unpublished autobiography, A Helmsman at the Ship of State
26. Script of TV pilot for Prizes for the People
27. Extract from Peter Maxwell's unpublished autobiography
28. Evidence of a marital crisis between Dr and Mrs Jones
29. Interview with Dr Alfred Jones: dinner at the Ritz
30. Dr Jones fails to find a date in his diary to meet Mrs Jones
31. Extract from Peter Maxwell's unpublished autobiography
32. Dr Jones's testimony of events which occurred at the launch of the Yemen salmon project
33. Conclusions of the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Select Committee.

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m
MamaRuns
Jul 31, 2017

This is written as a series of memos, interviews, and journal entries taken from different perspectives. I really enjoyed the story and it wasn't predictable at all. It is a bit slow as there really is no action, but I couldn't put it down and wanted to know what would become of the project.

d
dylankemp
Mar 13, 2017

Really quite an interesting movie. Well written.

c
Cas22
Apr 09, 2015

This tongue-in-cheek novel could easily have been the basis for an episode of “Yes Minister”. It has all the right ingredients – a ludicrous project, opportunistic politicians, manipulative spin doctors, ambitious bureaucrats and hapless minions who become convenient scapegoats when things go pear-shaped. Into this mix the author weaves a touch of romance and some schmaltzy philosophy along the lines of “believe it and it will happen.” It’s not an entirely successful novel but anyone who has ever worked in politics or the public service will have a strong sense of déjà vu.

s
sharon711
Feb 13, 2013

Alfred Jones is our quintessential scientist. His career highlight: Effects of increased water acidity on the caddis fly larva. His life is turned on end when he’s ordered to take on the impossible: introducing salmon into a wadi in Yemen. How this assignment affects his life and that of people close to him propels the plot. Never dull, the story twists its way to its surprising end. One thing is sure. As the sheik affirms: faith is the cure that heals all troubles. Without faith there is no hope and no love. This story, told through diary entries, newspaper articles, Hansard records and journal items (all forms of written communication) presents a powerful picture of the conflict between science, politics, and religion. At the core I think it's about the failures of communication. All the main story lines end poorly for the characters mainly because of inept communication with the people who matter. A clever novel at its heart and an entertaining read on the surface. Highly recommended!

s
sharon711
Dec 14, 2012

Alfred Jones is our quintessential scientist. His career highlight: Effects of increased water acidity on the caddis fly larva. His life is turned on end when he’s ordered to take on the impossible: introducing salmon into a wadi in Yemen. How this assignment affects his life and that of people close to him propels the plot. Never dull, the story twists its way to its surprising end. One thing is sure. As the sheik affirms: faith is the cure that heals all troubles. Without faith there is no hope and no love. This story, told through diary entries, newspaper articles, Hansard records and journal items (all forms of written communication) presents a powerful picture of the conflict between science, politics, and religion. At the core I think it's about the failures of communication. All the main story lines end poorly for the characters mainly because of inept communication with the people who matter. A clever novel at its heart and an entertaining read on the surface. Highly recommended!

b
bookwormjeph
Oct 02, 2012

an average book that didn't really hold my interest as I found it a little bland and unbelievable. It certainly doesn't inspire me to see the film.

s
Sanrin
May 05, 2012

A wealthy sheik from Yemen who loves salmon fishing develops a vision to build a water system in his country to enable his people to experience the peace and fellowship he himself has experienced fishing in Scotland. He enlists the help of a skeptical scientist with a British fisheries agency and a competent young project manager.

The beginning is interesting, as the scientist struggles with his skepticism and the narrow, political nature of his world, as he is confronted by the warmth and compelling nature of the sheik's vision and faith.

The story unfortunately grows more fantastical towards the middle, and the ending feels like a convenient shortcut, rather like like the endings in Agatha Christie mysteries where the murderer helpfully commits suicide so that the implications of the crimes don't need to be addressed.

But an enjoyable read.

catincharge Feb 15, 2012

Really well done. Reminded me at times of the old 'Yes, Minister' TV series crossed with 'Major Pettigrew's Last Stand'. Very effective story telling.

r
rjamesevans
Jul 31, 2011

I really liked this book. It is an unusual combination of an amusing cynical parody of political and business life (in the UK but it could be here) and a romantic, strangely affecting moral and romantic tale. Very clever! RJE

e
EmilyEm
May 06, 2010

There's a Dilbert-from-the-Sunday-funnies quality to this book about an unlikely project championed for all the seeming ?right' reasons. You'll laugh, particularly if you've ever worked in a big organization.

Unfortunately, this book loses it as it approaches its ending. It's the author's first book and that sometimes happens. One character?the one I liked the least?had too much to say! If the movie is ever made as I read it might be and if Colin Firth plays Dr. Alfred as reported it's easy to visualize him as this well-meaning scientist and misunderstood husband!

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