It Happened on the Way to War

It Happened on the Way to War

A Marine's Path to Peace

eBook - 2011
Average Rating:
1
Rate this:
In 2000 Rye Barcott spent a summer in the Kibera slum of Nairobi, Kenya. A college student heading into the Marines, he sought to better understand ethnic violence--something he would likely face later in uniform. He learned Swahili, asked questions, and listened to young people talk about surviving in poverty he had never imagined. Anxious to help but unsure what to do, he stumbled into friendship with a widowed nurse, Tabitha Atieno Festo, and a hardscrabble community organizer, Salim Mohamed. Together, this unlikely trio built a non-governmental organization that would develop a new generation of leaders from within one of Africa's largest slums. Their organization, Carolina for Kibera (CFK), is now a global pioneer of the movement called Participatory Development. As Barcott continued his leadership in CFK while serving as a human intelligence officer in Iraq, Bosnia, and the Horn of Africa, the tools he learned building a community in Kenya helped him become a more effective counterinsurgent and peacekeeper.--From publisher description.
Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury USA, 2011.
Edition: 1st U.S. ed.
ISBN: 9781608195015
1608195015
Characteristics: 1 online resource (viii, 340 p., [8] p. of plates) : col. ill., maps.
Contents: Pt. 1. The grenade ; Big Gota (fist bump) ; The present and future leaders ; "Because I can" ; What's the key?
pt. 2. Doers ; The sword ; Things fall apart ; Messiahs ; Harambee ; War on trash
pt. 3. From peacetime to wartime ; Change and continuity ; Spyderco ; Compartments ; Grass, flower, and wind ; The manuscript ; The elephant and the velvet glove ; Eleven years old and his life is already behind him ; Impact.
Summary: In 2000 Rye Barcott spent a summer in the Kibera slum of Nairobi, Kenya. A college student heading into the Marines, he sought to better understand ethnic violence--something he would likely face later in uniform. He learned Swahili, asked questions, and listened to young people talk about surviving in poverty he had never imagined. Anxious to help but unsure what to do, he stumbled into friendship with a widowed nurse, Tabitha Atieno Festo, and a hardscrabble community organizer, Salim Mohamed. Together, this unlikely trio built a non-governmental organization that would develop a new generation of leaders from within one of Africa's largest slums. Their organization, Carolina for Kibera (CFK), is now a global pioneer of the movement called Participatory Development. As Barcott continued his leadership in CFK while serving as a human intelligence officer in Iraq, Bosnia, and the Horn of Africa, the tools he learned building a community in Kenya helped him become a more effective counterinsurgent and peacekeeper.--From publisher description.

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

bbonier Dec 01, 2013

In describing his struggles to aid residents of the slums of Kibera, Kenya, Barcott is actually tooting his own horn, but the story is well written and inspirational. He comes across as a very polite, likable young man. It is amazing what he was able to accomplish.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at CML

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top